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Best paper award

The objective of the award is to recognize the contributions of CSACS members to the research areas of Self-Assembly.

Students and/or CSACS members will send their papers for nominations. A maximum of 3 papers will be selected by the Education & colloquia committee with respect to various criteria such as impact and originality. Nominated publications will be judged by international advisory committee who will choose the article which will be awarded the prize. The prize will consist of a plaque, lunch and the registration to a conference in 20xx.

The article must have been published or accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal in the calendar year.

Deadlines

  • For paper nominations published during 2015: 14 February 2015
  • For the Education & colloquia committee to select 3 publications: 1 March 2016
  • For the advisor committee to select the winner: 28 March 2016
  • Announcing the winner at the CSACS annual meeting: May 2016

2015

 

Stepwise growth of surface-grafted DNA nanotubes visualized at the single-molecule level

Hanadi Sleiman, McGill University

Gonzalo Cosa, McGill University

Nature Chemistry

In this work we have devised a solid-state synthesis to produce surface-grafted robust DNA nanotubes. Just like a Tetris game, where we manipulate the game pieces with the aim of creating a horizontal line of several blocks...

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(PDF, 295 kb)
DOI

2014

 

Crystal Engineering of Dual Channel p/n Organic Semiconductors by Complementary Hydrogen Bonding

Dima Perepichka, McGill University

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.

This work, featured on the inside cover of Angewandte, represents a major advancement in solid-state structural control of organic electronic materials.

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(PDF, 308 kb)
DOI

2013

 

Site-specific positioning of dendritic alkyl chains on DNA cages enables their geometry-dependent self-assembly

This is an image of the best paper 2013

Hanadi Sleiman, McGill University

Nature Chemistry

In this paper we show that DNA cages can be loaded with small molecule drugs and release them in the presence of a specific DNA sequence. To carry out this function, we first created DNA cubes using short component DNA strands. We then decorated them with lipid-like molecules. When organised on the three-dimensional DNA scaffold, these lipids can act like sticky patches, that come together in a well-defined way. Depending on their geometry, they can engage in a 'handshake' on the inside or outside of the DNA cube.

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(PDF, 126 kb)
DOI

2012

 

Maximizing Field-Effect Mobility and Solid-State Luminescence in Organic Semiconductors.

This is an image of the best paper 2012

Federico Rosei, INRS-EMT

Dmitrii Perepichka, McGill University

Angewandte Chemie International Edition

The paper reports the first design and synthesis of structurally simple organic semiconductor that exhibits high hole and electron mobility of up to 2.6 cm2/Vs and 0.13 cm2/Vs, respectively, exceptional operational (no degradation in >104 cycles) and storage stability, along with high solid state emission (photoluminescence quantum yield ~70%) and electroluminescence property.

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(PDF, 95 kb)
DOI

2010

 

Loading and selective release of cargo in DNA nanotubes with longitudinal variation

This is an image of the best paper 2010

Gonzalo Cosa, McGill University

Hanadi Sleiman, McGill University

Nature Chemistry

We have created the first examples of DNA nanotubes that encapsulate and load cargo on their inside, and then release it rapidly and completely, when a specific external DNA strand is added.

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(PDF, 219 kb)
DOI